NACE CARS 2016 DAY 3

NACE CARS 2016 DAY 3

Day 3 of NACE CARS was the last day of training and forums and once again there was a full schedule.

NACE CARS 2016 DAY 3

Day 3 of NACE CARS was the last day of training and forums and once again there was a full schedule. Whether you were looking for management or technical training, collision or service topics NACE had a class for you each day. This day I chose to attend the Technology and Telematics Forum.

Once again there was a lot of emphasis on security and the first panel spent a good deal of time covering the need to secure the vehicle from hacking. Now that so many cars have built in WiFi systems there is even more potential to access and control the car remotely. One of the speakers, Craig Smith of Theia Labs, does just that for a living, he hacks automotive systems to find the weak spots so manufacturers can close the access point. He says the most impactful hacks are the ones done from the farthest away. He attacks through the Bluetooth, WiFi and dongles on the car.

They described the way a car is made as being similar to ordering a hamburger; they all start with the basic meat and bun and things are added to suit the buyer. None of the cars made today are designed from the ground up for security.

Today software makes up about 18% of the cars function. They claim that in 10 years that will rise to 60%.

Another area of concern is owners, or their techs, hacking a car to turn on features that are software controlled. For example, all Ford Fusions use the same GEM module but are programmed differently for optional features to work. Cleaver folks are figuring out how to turn on features that were not paid for with the purchase of the car. Sort of like hacking cable TV a few years ago.

 They stressed that a car is never done. Even after the customer drives it off the makers are still putting out updates and changes to make it work better.  

The second panel spoke about Collision Avoidance system.

Despite all of the progress made with these systems over the last decade traffic deaths actually went up in 2015 by 7% over the previous year.

These systems fall into 2 groups, passive and active. Those that give us warnings are passive and those that take independent action are active. Most cars will have active collision systems by 2020 and they estimate that will reduce rear end collisions by 60%, preventing over 900,000 accidents. While this may be good news for the insurance companies and car owners it will have a very big impact on the collision repair business.

Both of the rating organizations, IIHS and NTHSA, have or will add Collision Avoidance as part of their score for crash safety.

A very significant concern for repairers is the recalibration of these systems. Audi has much of it mounted to the windshield and every time it is replaced the sensors have to be realigned. Ford has cameras in the mirrors and when the mirror is replaced there is a floor mat that surrounds the car with targets on it that the camera will use to realign itself. As little as 1 degree of misalignment can render the system unsafe because of delayed or premature response.

The final panel was about the future of security in our cars. The important thing here was that we do not know what we will have in the future. Features we cannot imagine today may be included in our daily driver.

Such things as facial recognition to secure your car from theft and alcohol sensors to prevent drunk driving are already in the works.

All of the panels agreed that the next 10 years will see as much, or more change to the car as we have seen in the last 50.

]

This day I chose to attend the Technology and Telematics Forum.

Once again there was a lot of emphasis on security and the first panel spent a good deal of time covering the need to secure the vehicle from hacking. Now that so many cars have built in WiFi systems there is even more potential to access and control the car remotely. One of the speakers, Craig Smith of Theia Labs, does just that for a living, he hacks automotive systems to find the weak spots so manufacturers can close the access point. He says the most impactful hacks are the ones done from the farthest away. He attacks through the Bluetooth, WiFi and dongles on the car.

They described the way a car is made as being similar to ordering a hamburger; they all start with the basic meat and bun and things are added to suit the buyer. None of the cars made today are designed from the ground up for security.

Today software makes up about 18% of the cars function. They claim that in 10 years that will rise to 60%.

Another area of concern is owners, or their techs, hacking a car to turn on features that are software controlled. For example, all Ford Fusions use the same GEM module but are programmed differently for optional features to work. Cleaver folks are figuring out how to turn on features that were not paid for with the purchase of the car. Sort of like hacking cable TV a few years ago.

 They stressed that a car is never done. Even after the customer drives it off the makers are still putting out updates and changes to make it work better.  

The second panel spoke about Collision Avoidance system.

Despite all of the progress made with these systems over the last decade traffic deaths actually went up in 2015 by 7% over the previous year.

These systems fall into 2 groups, passive and active. Those that give us warnings are passive and those that take independent action are active. Most cars will have active collision systems by 2020 and they estimate that will reduce rear end collisions by 60%, preventing over 900,000 accidents. While this may be good news for the insurance companies and car owners it will have a very big impact on the collision repair business.

Both of the rating organizations, IIHS and NTHSA, have or will add Collision Avoidance as part of their score for crash safety.

A very significant concern for repairers is the recalibration of these systems. Audi has much of it mounted to the windshield and every time it is replaced the sensors have to be realigned. Ford has cameras in the mirrors and when the mirror is replaced there is a floor mat that surrounds the car with targets on it that the camera will use to realign itself. As little as 1 degree of misalignment can render the system unsafe because of delayed or premature response.

The final panel was about the future of security in our cars. The important thing here was that we do not know what we will have in the future. Features we cannot imagine today may be included in our daily driver.

Such things as facial recognition to secure your car from theft and alcohol sensors to prevent drunk driving are already in the works.

All of the panels agreed that the next 10 years will see as much, or more change to the car as we have seen in the last 50.

]